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What's Tabata Anyway?

What's Tabata Anyway?

For those who are (always) seeking new ways to boost their workouts, you’ve probably heard of Tabata. But, what is it? Why is everyone so obsessed with it? And, moreover, is it really that better than just doing your standard go-to cardio exercise? We’ll tell you.

For those who don’t know, Tabata is a form of HIIT (high intensity interval training) that consists of 8 rounds of 20 seconds on, and 10 seconds off. It’s not a lengthy workout, most times, it can be wrapped up in 30-45 minutes (including warm up and cool down stretches), however, it’s an extremely effective workout. It should be said right here and now that traditional, fast-paced and high-impact, Tabata is not for beginners. This workout routine is best for those who have been exercising for a while (even, “advanced” exercises) as it will nip your plateau in the bud, and then some. Simply put, it’s intense, but it works. In fact, it promotes your metabolism to run faster, trains your body to tolerate lactic acid, and it keeps your body burning fat for a whole 24 hours after your workout.

Where did it come from?

As with many things, the Tabata workout was originally a fitness research study. Japanese physician and researcher, Dr. Izumi Tabata, conducted a 6-week study between two groups of people: Group A (the controlled group) performed one hour of moderate exercise, 5x a week. Group B performed the Tabata-style workout. There was an immediate and drastic difference regarding the length that both groups exercised for: with Group A totaling 1,800 minutes versus Group B at 120 minutes. Despite this difference, the results were surprising. In fact, at the end of the study, Group B had improved both its anaerobic and aerobic fitness levels, with the latter surging 28%.

Is It “New”?

No, but with most things, it recently gained more popularity once these workouts were incorporated to workout regimens by celebrity trainers. In fact, interval training was initially intended for runners, with 20-second sprints followed by 10-second rest periods. Over time, this method of training advances cardiovascular fitness.

So, what’s an example of a Tabata workout? Try this for 20 seconds on, 10 seconds off, then repeat this set 8 times.

  • Push-ups
  • Jumping Jacks
  • Squats
  • Bicycle Crunches

Keep in mind, that when selecting exercises to integrate, select ones that target different body parts and muscles for a cohesive workout! For more information about Tabata or to work with a personal trainer to show you how you reap the benefits of it, give us a call at (855) 496-4899!

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