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Why You Should Stop Procrastinating on That Spring Cleaning

Why You Should Stop Procrastinating on That Spring Cleaning

If you’ve been putting off your spring cleaning, you might want to reconsider— not just because spring is almost over, but because decluttering your living space is actually linked to having health benefits.

Start with the bedroom. A study recently found a correlation with levels of clutter in a bedroom and the quality of sleep, so if your bedroom is a mess and you haven’t been sleeping well, it might be time to make a few changes!

Next, take care of your kitchen. Keeping your kitchen clean and organized will encourage you to use the space more frequently— which may encourage you to eat at home more often instead of opting to eat out, saving you both money AND calories.

Your bathroom, office, and living space should all follow suit. Decluttering can decrease levels of stress, depression, and anxiety. Unfinished projects and piles of junk everywhere can lead to what some people call “mental clutter”, but decluttering, a form of self-care, can actually help you feel like you’re giving yourself an improved quality of life. Tidying up may not be the answer to all psychological challenges you may be facing, but if you’ve felt unfocused or a little down recently, it’s worth giving it a try!

As you organize and purge more items from your home, you may find that there is less surface area for dust to accumulate on— a huge bonus if you, a housemate, or a guest have dust allergies.

Once your space is clean and organized, keeping everything tidy and in its place is a great way to help you start developing consistent habits. Clean as you go, develop a schedule where you vacuum, sweep, mop, and/or dust regularly, take care of any “homeless” objects you may have misplaced, and take care of the week’s laundry. Developing habits is a habit of it’s own, so starting small can encourage big changes down the road.

A few extra benefits:

Studies have linked severe levels of clutter— called hoarding— to obesity. Even if your cluttered home doesn’t look like it belongs in an episode of “Hoarders”, decluttering may help you shed a few extra pounds, and with a renewed state of mind, you might just get into the right place to find a consistent fitness routine to stick to! You may find that once your space is tidied up and everything has a “home”, you’ll spend a lot less time looking for misplaced or missing objects (think: keys, cell phone, wallet). You may even be able to make some money in the cleaning process— either by finding it in places you never thought possible, or by selling your old undesired/unused items to others.

Happy cleaning!

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